Tag Archives: innovation

TEDxKL 2013

Great fun #@tedxkl

TEDxKL2013_edited

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Significant Day for SRI

Sekhar Research Innovations signing ceremony with AIM & QMA

A significant milestone for SRI and I, we inked our term sheet with Agensi Innovasi Malaysia and QuestMark Group. An important step for us but marking the begining of our journey and the challenges to come.

The excitement at the prospect of moving ahead with greater momentum is palpable, the entire team is galvanized for the next steps.

Digital News Asia

Signing Term Sheet with AIM & QMA

A long journey for all of us, I am personally looking forward to publishing technical papers on our innovation and starting the process of introduction of SRI Compounds into the market, the Global Market.

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In Praise of Irrational Innovators

Scott Anthony

Scott leads Innosight’s Asian operations. His fourth book on innovation, The Little Black Book of Innovation, is now available (HBR Press, January 2012). Follow him on Twitter at @ScottDAnthony.

I love my three young children immensely. So it’s hard for me to be fully rational about them. Of course they are the smartest, the best looking, and the most athletic. I’m not alone — all parents are irrational. We lose sleep worrying about things we can’t control and take pride in ridiculously small achievements we had nothing to do with.

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Joel Makower “So, we need to align green innovations, and the marketing that goes into them, with the idea of being better, not just greener.”

Joel Makower: Green business maven shares his insights

Makower, one of the most respected voices in green business, talks about greener corporations, what the government could be doing to foster more environmentally friendly businesses, and why he’s optimistic about the future.

Mon, Jan 30 2012 at 10:16 PM EST Joel Makower Photo: Joel Makower Joel Makower grew up in California and graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in journalism. He worked as a journalist and nationally syndicated columnist and is a prolific author, with more than a dozen books published, including the oral history of the Woodstock music festival, a book that Rolling Stone called “the definitive history of the mega-event.” He has focused on the environment for more than 20 years and is a well-respected speaker, writer and consultant on all things green business including regular appearances on NPR’s “Marketplace” as a commentator. Joel is the chairman and executive editor of the GreenBiz Group and founder of GreenBiz. I have been a fan of Joel’s writing for as long as I’ve been reading environmental news and commentary. His book “Beyond The Bottom Line” was one of the first green business books I read and was a major influence in how I see the intersection between business and environment. I’m thrilled that he so kindly took the time to answer these seven questions. MNN: Does the world need saving?

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6 Big HealthTech Ideas That Will Change Medicine In 2012

TechCrunch

Josh Constine

“In the future we might not prescribe drugs all the time, we might prescribe apps.” Singularity University‘s executive director of FutureMed Daniel Kraft M.D. sat down with me to discuss the biggest emerging trends in HealthTech. Here we’ll look at how A.I, big data, 3D printing, social health networks and other new technologies will help you get better medical care. Kraft believes that by analyzing where the field is going, we have the ability to reinvent medicine and build important new business models.

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Artificial hips glide on graphite

22 December 2011
Metal-on metal hip replacements are lubricated by a layer of graphite, say scientists in the US. And this graphitic layer may be the product of proteins ground up the implant itself. This knowledge could help the design of new implants but also raises important questions about the action of the graphite in the body.

Over 50,000 hip replacements are performed each year in the UK and in the US that number is over 200,000. But although surgeons are moving towards low wearing metal-on-metal joints, no one is precisely sure why the two metal pieces slide so well. Although it is known there is a layer that affects the friction, lubrication and wear of the two surfaces, known as a tribological layer, until now no-one has examined its composition.

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Tesla Comes Through With Sub-$50,000 Model S, Mostly

Hannah Elliott, Forbes Staff

The Tesla Model S

Tesla today announced official pricing for its four-door electric sedan: $49,900 for a base Model S after a $7,500 federal tax credit.

The announcement comes after months of Tesla founder Elon Musk promising to deliver his first four-door electric car for around $50,000. (Tesla started selling its battery-powered $109,000 Roadsters in 2008.)

Of course, higher performing versions of the seven-passenger sedan will cost more: $59,900 for a 60 kWh (230-mile-range) model and $69,900 for an 85 kWh (300-mile-range) model. The 85 kWh performance Model S, which comes with additional equipment like Nappa leather interior and performance wheels, will cost $79,900 after federal tax rebates. Musk says it will go 0-60mph in 4.4 seconds.  More…….

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China opens doors of state-run companies to world’s top talent

By Vivek Wadhwa, Wednesday, November 16, 3:48 AM

The top talent in countries around the world have a new suitor: the Chinese government.

China has a severe shortage of skilled talent and, in a policy reversal, has decided to open its doors to talent from around the world. This could mean that the brilliant NASA scientists the U.S. laid off, could find new employment — and a new home — in Shanghai or Beijing.

Chinese research labs have long had difficulty recruiting qualified workers to perform necessary research and development, and its corporations struggle to find competent managers. The situation will likely get worse as China’s high-tech industries grow and it increases its national R&D spending from the present 1.62 percent of GDP, according to the Chinese government, to the planned 2.5 percent by 2020. China’s President Hu Jintao, in May 2010, declared talent development a national priority in order to fill the void. The goal is to dramatically increase the education level of China’s workforce and to build an innovation economy.

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What I learned from Steve Jobs

By: Guy Kawasaki

OCTOBER 8, 2011

Guy Kawasaki

guest column.  Many people have explained what one can learn from Steve Jobs. But few, if any, of these people have been inside the tent and experienced first hand what it was like to work with him. I don’t want any lessons to be lost or forgotten, so here is my list of the top 12 lessons I learned from Steve Jobs.

1. Experts are clueless Experts—journalists, analysts, consultants, bankers, and gurus can’t “do” so they “advise.” They can tell you what is wrong with your product, but they cannot make a great one. They can tell you how to sell something, but they cannot sell it themselves. They can tell you how to create great teams, but they only manage a secretary. For example, the experts told us that the two biggest shortcomings of Macintosh in the mid 1980s were the lack of a daisy-wheel printer driver and Lotus 1-2-3; another advice gem from the experts was to buy Compaq. Hear what experts say, but don’t always listen to them.

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Innovation

The 30th of July 2009, a very special day for me, one that I am unlikely to ever forget. We all have our ultimate goals and challenges in life, some spiritual while yet others take on mythic proportions to be striven for but more often than not, never achieved.

Green Tire before Moulding

Well I’ve been hunting my version of big game for some time now, in some ways a shared obsession with my father. For my father it was achievable, in his view it was just a matter of time, something just around the corner. After he left us, for me it became an elusive hydra, using it’s many heads to throw one impediment after another in my way. Strange how technology and chemistry can take on such colourful proportions but in this case getting there has been on par with finding “Big Foot” or the veritable doorway to Shanri-La.

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